P.E.A.C.E. Garden fights child food insecurity in Macon, GA

The P.E.A.C.E. Garden invites Macon-Bibb youth to help with garden maintenance, learn about agriculture and strengthen a healthy food outlet that addresses the community’s food insecurity.

The P.E.A.C.E. Garden invites Macon-Bibb youth to help with garden maintenance, learn about agriculture and strengthen a healthy food outlet that addresses the community’s food insecurity.

\ Courtesy of Carl Myers

Community activist Carl Myers’ P.E.A.C.E. Garden started off as blighted property until he envisioned it as another answer to Macon-Bibb’s food insecurity problem.

The garden, located at 1934 Forsyth St., is walking distance from the Booker T. Washington Community Center and L.H. Williams Elementary School. Myers said he chose the location because it aligns with his goals of community involvement and youth education.

“Farming and agriculture is usually foreign to youth. They usually don’t see that process of how food is being grown,” Myers said. “I thought it was imperative to teach them that, and also address the food scarcity and food deserts in Macon.”

Myers said P.E.A.C.E. is an acronym for multiple meanings, including Positive Energy Always

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Reducing food insecurity the goal of a rooftop garden at Baptist Health-Fort Smith

Baptist Health-Fort Smith is growing fruits and vegetables in a new rooftop garden in hopes of addressing food insecurity among its patients. It’s the first of its kind in Arkansas, and just one of 25 nationwide, according to hospital officials.

Located on the roof of Marvin Altman Fitness Center on the Baptist Health-Fort Smith campus, the garden is capable of growing 27 different crops of fruits and vegetables. Baptist Health employees and the River Valley Master Gardeners volunteered their time to plant winter crops such as swiss chard, turnips and beets at the end of October with the first phase of planting complete on Oct. 30, said Hannah Schultz, graduate assistant at Baptist Health-Fort Smith.

Those crops will be ready for harvest in the middle to end of December, said Schultz, who began researching and planning the garden in July.

“All crops have been selected and planned according to their

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New Baptist Health rooftop garden opens up to patients

The produce from the garden will be included in the Baptist Health Food Rx program, which provides food-insecure patients with a three-day food supply.

FORT SMITH, Ark. — Baptist Health-Fort Smith opened a new rooftop garden at the Marvin Altman Fitness Center with hopes of addressing and combating the issue of food insecurity among its patients by offering fruits and vegetables.

The rooftop garden will be “the first of its kind” in Arkansas and “one of 25” in the nation, Baptist said.  

The produce from the garden will be included in the Baptist Health Food Rx program. The program provides discharged patients who have been identified as food insecure with a three-day food supply for a family of four.

Hannah Schultz, a graduate assistant at Baptist Health-Fort Smith, started researching and planning the garden in July. Volunteers from Baptist Health and the River Valley Master Gardeners officially began planting

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Homewood community garden offers residents access to fresh food amid growing grocery costs

At the Sankofa Community Garden at the intersection of Susquehanna Street and North Brushton Avenue in Homewood, bright garden beds decorate the space and offer a variety of vegetables, including peppers, zucchini, and cucumbers.

Vikki Jones, the owner of Sankofa, sits at the center of the lot, surrounded by grandchildren and garden volunteers. Jones has made the garden not only an important part of Homewood but also her own family.

I have two students who’ve been with me for two and three years. I have two new students that are very enthusiastic. I have grandchildren and my intern, and I’ve instilled in my family the importance of this,” said Jones. “So when no one’s here, we’re here.”

She’s describing the mission and collaborative nature of the garden. As food prices skyrocket due to disruptions in the global supply chain and the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, Jones said

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Grow and Give from your garden this summer

Are you growing a garden in your backyard or have a few containers of tomatoes on your patio? Do you know what you will do with any extra veggies you might grow this summer?

Colorado State University Extension has a solution for your overabundant garden and can help you make the most out of your harvest — it’s called Grow & Give. Through the Grow & Give program, you can donate those extra zucchinis, tomatoes and beans to a local food pantry or a neighbor in need and make a positive impact on others.

The Grow & Give program was created in spring 2020 as a modern victory garden project to help Coloradans learn to grow food, share their harvest and keep it in their local communities.

Back then, you might remember people flocking to garden centers across the state to empty the shelves and buy up all the seed

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